Keloidal Scar

Any time dark skin is cut or burned, there’s an increased risk of keloids — a scar that spreads beyond the boundary of the original injury and develops into a growth. Symptoms may include itching, pain, burning, and tenderness at the site. Keloids are thought to be linked to a defect in collagen production. Treatments include cortisone injections, radiation therapy, pressure dressings, and silicone gel applications. Keloids can also be removed via surgery or with a laser.

Frequently Asked Questions

Most people get these scars after they injure their skin, such as from a cut or puncture wound. Getting a tattoo or piercing can also cause a keloid. Sometimes, a surgical scar turns into a keloid.

Keloids may continue to grow slowly for weeks, months, or years. They eventually stop growing but do not disappear on their own. Once a keloid develops, it is permanent unless removed or treated successfully. It is common for keloids that have been removed or treated to return.

It is a result of an overgrowth of granulation tissue (collagen type 3) at the site of a healed skin injury which is then slowly replaced by collagen type 1. Keloids are firm, rubbery lesions, or shiny, fibrous nodules, and can vary from pink to the color of the person’s skin or red to dark brown.

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